LEADERSHIP + TYPES OF INFLUENCE2022-01-14T18:50:36+00:00

LEADERSHIP STYLES AND TYPES OF INFLUENCE

LEADERSHIP STYLES
These tools explore the diverse ways people influence one another. The first person we need to lead is ourselves. By doing so, an overflow of stewarding our character is the effect it has on others. Exploring the best way to influence others while continuing to steward our character is the crossroad of leadership.
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There are 5 Leadership Styles, which we use to lead & develop individuals within our organizations towards our Transcendent THERE:

1. DIRECTIVE

  • Leaders assign the THP to others. They dictate where we are going and how we are going to get there. It is the least developmental, based mostly on Positional Influence. When this style is used, participants are placed relatively low on the Freedom V.
  • Directive Leadership is beneficial for individuals who:
    • Are new to the organization
    • Are new to the position/role
    • Have been moved down the Freedom V

2. TRANSACTIONAL

  • Leaders use positive and negative consequences to motivate others. If you do this you will get a reward. If you do not do this there will be disciplinary action.
  • This style is based mostly on Positional, Reward, and Coercive Influence, and can be developmental when used in the short term to help teach the importance of boundaries and consequences, and help people develop good habits. When this style is used individuals tend to be low on the Freedom V.
  • Transactional Leadership is beneficial for individuals who:
    • Are grappling to understand or accept the vision
    • Need reinforcement for meeting (or failing to meet) expectations/boundaries

3. PARTICIPATIVE

  • Leaders show others the THP, participating in some capacity to empower and guide them towards the THERE.
  • This style relies mostly on Expert Influence, and is very effective for teaching and mentoring. Encouraging greater levels of proficiency and ownership will help to move individuals higher up the Freedom V.

4. DELEGATIVE

  • Leaders assign the THERE to individuals and delegate the task of them finding the PATH. Leaders can delegate responsibility but not authority. Leaders must still have systems and checks in place to ensure the project is getting done. Delegative differs from Directive in that the leader is still actively involved and is seeking input/feedback. Individuals who receive delegation tend to be higher up on the Freedom V.
  • Delegative Leadership is beneficial for those who:
    • Have demonstrated a level of proficiency within their roles
    • Are committed to the THERE

5. TRANSFORMATIONAL

  • Leaders share and actively participate in THP process. Leaders model THP, seek and share truth, and empower self-governance.
  • Transformational leadership leans heavily on Referent Power. Individuals who are led this way tend to be high on the Freedom V, understanding expectations and creating their own boundaries within those expectations.
  • Transformational Leadership is beneficial for those who:
    • Have demonstrated commitment to THP
    • Are capable/willing to take ownership in their share of the mission

ADDITIONAL RESOURCES

FREE DOWNLOAD OF SERVANT LEADERSHIP TOOLS FLASHCARD PACKET

PODCAST EPISODE

BLOG POSTS

SOMETHING WE ALL SHOULD KNOW ABOUT LEADERSHIP
EVERYONE IS A LEADER
THE LEADER GAMES
TYPES OF INFLUENCE
This model explores the diverse ways people influence one another, from obligation to inspiration, impersonal to shared endeavor. It challenges us to begin by leading ourselves and then exploring the best way to lead others.
FREE DOWNLOAD OF INDIVIDUAL FLASHCARD
Healthy leaders realize they cannot control others, but have the opportunity to influence others. It is an invitation to partner together towards something bigger than themselves. This leads to a shared vision, co-ownership of the mission, and an effective culture of self-governance.
The 5 Types of Influence

1. POSITIONAL INFLUENCE: Based on a title, job or position. You can gain positional influence by being placed in positions of authority. The position carries a perceived weight to it that allows the person to influence the thoughts, actions, and perceptions of others. Most sought after but least effective way to influence others.
Examples: A police officer. A teacher. A parent. A coach.

2. COERCIVE INFLUENCE: Comes from the perception that someone has the ability to punish or enact negative consequences. You gain coercive influence through following through on disciplinary threats, reinforcing established boundaries. You lose coercive influence when you do not follow through.
Examples: Discipline from a parent. Anger from a spouse. Ridicule from a friend group. Demotion from a manager.

3. REWARD INFLUENCE Comes from the perception that someone has the ability to reward if you do, think, say what they are asking. You gain influence over others by following through on promises of reward. You lose reward influence by not following through on promised rewards.
Examples: Teammates applaud performance on the field. Teacher gives out snacks or prizes when the student answers correctly. Boss gives a raise to an employee for doing a good job. Parents extend curfew when the child stewards responsibility well.

4. EXPERT INFLUENCE: Comes from demonstrating a level of expertise in a specific area. You gain expert influence through demonstrating proficiency and you lose influence by pretending to know answers when you don’t or providing false/inadequate information on a topic.
Examples: Professor who has studied and published in their fields. An experienced skateboarder who knows more tricks than a novice. A married person giving relationship advice to a single (or newlywed) friend.

5. REFERENT INFLUENCE: This type of influence comes from doing life in a way others want to emulate. The stewardship of one’s own character. You gain referent influence through strengthening your Pillars. You lose referent influence through demonstrating poor character or choices.
Examples: A personal hero–mom, dad, a mentor, a coach. Historical figures renowned for service, courage, and character– Ghandi, Mother Teresa, or Abraham Lincoln.

ADDITIONAL RESOURCES

PODCAST EPISODE

BLOG POSTS

THE 5 (TYPES OF PEOPLE) THAT INFLUENCE YOU
WHY INFLUENCE IS MORE POWERFUL THAN POSITION
THE GREATEST OBSTACLE TO UTILIZING INFLUENCE
THE TENETS OF REFERENT POWER
A tool for cultivating Referent Influence. Gaining referent power is about both becoming the best person you can be and leading others most effectively. The tenets of referent power help us to be intentional about stewarding our lives by showing the key areas of life on which to focus our goals.

Referent Influence is achieved as you strengthen your pillars. People want to emulate others who they feel are stewarding these pillars well. “Strong” pillars means healthy and true, not superficial success. For example, a healthy emotional pillar is not someone who is never angry or sad (or pretends to be), but someone who stewards those emotions well. True vulnerability is stronger than false masking.

The stronger the pillar the greater level of influence you will have in that area. The weaker the pillar the less ability you will have to influence others in that area. We have the ability to strengthen our pillars through investing time and energy into each of them.

FREE DOWNLOAD OF INDIVIDUAL FLASHCARD

The 6 Tenets of Referent Power

1. Physical: How someone presents themselves, physical appearance and presence.
2. Financial: How an individual stewards their finances.
3. Social: A person’s ability to interact with others relationally.
4, Spiritual: A person’s relationship with God, trust and commitment to something bigger than themselves.
5. Mental/Emotional: An individual’s mental and emotional intelligence.
6. Family/Team: An individual’s mental and emotional intelligence.

ADDITIONAL RESOURCES

BLOG POSTS:

THE DISCIPLINE OF IMPROVEMENT (PILLARS OF GROWTH)

VIDEO SERIES

ALL THE TOOLS
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